Interview with author John Corey Whaley about his book “Highly Illogical Behavior”

highly-illogical-behaviorIn this interview, I talk with John Corey Whaley, author of the book Highly Illogical Behavior. The novel, peppered with Star Trek: The Next Generation references, tells tale of Solomon, a teen with a severe anxiety disorder who hasn’t left the house in over three years and the friendship that will either save or ruin him.

Buzzfeed calls Highly Illogical Behavior, “Another raw, funny, and unforgettable read from Whaley that won’t leave you disappointed.” Tune in to find out how Corey’s own experiences with anxiety influenced him to write this story and how writing LGBT characters has changed in recent years.

Originally aired on KBOO Community Radio, Portland, Oregon for the program Between the Covers. http://kboo.fm/media/50583-john-corey-whaley-highly-illogical-behavior

Interview with author Jesse Andrews about his book “The Haters”

hatersIn this interview, I talk with Jesse Andrews, author of the book The Haters. This hilarious and touching story follows Wes Doolittle and his friends as they escape the oppression of jazz band camp and set off on a road trip in search of a venue to play an epic concert that will establish them as a band.

Booklist called The Haters: “Uproariously funny … very of-the- moment … Effortlessly readable, deeply enjoyable, and, given the years since Andrews’ fantastic debut, well worth the wait.” Tune in to hear Jesse hate on a cheesy band and to find out how his own musical background inspired him to write this story.

Originally aired on KBOO Community Radio, Portland, Oregon for the program Between the Covers. http://kboo.fm/media/49573-jesse-andrews-haters

Interview with author Cat Winters about her book “The Steep and Thorny Way”

steep-and-thornyIn this interview, I talk with Cat Winters, author of the book The Steep and Thorny Way. This historical fiction, loosely based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet, follows protagonist Hanalee as she navigates rural Oregon in the 1920’s as a biracial teen coming to terms with her father’s murder.

School Library Journal called The Steep and Thorny Way: “Unique and riveting historical fiction that feels anything but dated.” Tune in to find out how Cat makes history interesting with a supernatural twist and why young adult fiction is for everyone.

Originally aired on KBOO Community Radio, Portland, Oregon for the program Between the Covers. http://kboo.fm/media/49882-cat-winters-steep-and-thorny-way

Find It on the Web presentation

On October 6, 2011, I presented at the Nebraska Library Association annual conference.  I shared free online resources to use at the library.  Approximately 50 people attended the 50-minute presentation.

Find the list of resources I discussed here.

Find It on the Web handout

Find the PowerPoint presentation here.

Find It on the Web presentation

Thing #17: Prezi and SlideShare

I will preface my post by saying I like PowerPoint.  A lot.  Now SlideShare gives us a way to share our fabulous PowerPoint presentations easily, even if our recipient doesn’t have the same version of PowerPoint or doesn’t have PowerPoint at all.  Most recently, I have used SlideShare to share a presentation about the New Members Round Table of the Nebraska Library Association.  I was able to share the presentation with the others in the group, then send the link to local library students to view and learn about the group.  Additionally, I was able to embed the SlideShare presentation into our group’s blog.  You can view it at http://nebraskalibraries.org/NMRT/2011/04/learn-more-about-nmrt/

SlideShare is a very useful tool for sharing presentations in an accessible format.

Thing #12: Social media

Social media has been a valuable part of my career development.  I joined Facebook and LinkedIn a several years ago and have since built up a network of family, friends, past and present coworkers, classmates, and professional acquaintances.  The best example of using social media for networking and creating a sense of community occurred when I was working on my MLS online.  My classmates and I were all on the same “track” and were in the same classes each term.  We created a Facebook group to ask questions about assignments, vent our concerns and frustrations, share information, and help one another.  Although we were spread across the country, we were able to get to know one another and provide a support structure similar to a traditional classroom. 

I see both advantages and disadvantages to using social media.  The advantages include connecting people who are far apart, creating a fast and easy method of communication, providing a low pressure way to communicate, especially for those who are shy, and providing a fun way to keep in touch and share with others.  The disadvantages include replacing the intimacy of face-to-face contact with hands-off online communication and the occasional misinterpretation in communications.  In my mind, the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages.   

I plan to continue using social media for career development and appreciate that these free, easy-to-use tools are available to us.

Thing #6: Online networks

Online networks have created an easy and efficient way for people to come together and to keep in touch.  My grandma had never even touched a computer, but she realized the best way to hear from her grandchildren on a regular basis was to embrace technology.  She now has a laptop and an active Facebook page.

I opened a Facebook account about four years ago.  I almost immediately reconnected with a good friend from high school that I’d lost touch with after a move.  Since then, I have friended (and unfriended) coworkers, friends, classmates, and family members.  I have seen Facebook’s value in a variety of uses.  When I was working on my Master’s degree online, my classmates (who lived all over the country) and I created a Facebook group to communicate with and support one another.   An artist I know uses Facebook to share his work.  The library has a page to keep patrons informed.  I use Facebook for sharing pictures and keeping in touch.  If you’re smart about what you post and use the custom privacy settings, Facebook is a great way to connect with people.

I opened a LinkedIn account in 2008 when I was preparing to move and looking for a new job.  It has been a great networking tool.  If I meet someone new in a professional capacity, I try to connect with them.  I consider a LinkedIn profile to be a glorified business card- a reminder of who you are and how they know you- that won’t be lost or thrown away.  Any time I consider applying for a job, I check LinkedIn to see if any of my connections work for that company or know anyone who does.  I often wonder if potential employers do the same to me.  If they do, I feel better knowing I have a professional, updated profile.  In addition to networking, I have joined several “groups” on LinkedIn.  Following discussions on different aspects of the library profession has been interesting and helpful.  I would like to continue building connections on LinkedIn; if you would like to connect, my profile is located at http://www.linkedin.com/in/bethanygrabow

I know some people are hesitant to have a presence on online networks, but I have enjoyed my experiences and would encourage everyone to give it a try.